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>> hello everyone. welcome to our special coverage of the events in japan. >> welcome. >> here are the top stories of this hour. workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are scrambling to save the reactors from a meltdown following last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. in libya, the government says its supporters are making gains at the expense of rivals. the u.n. secretary general urges all sidein the conflict to cause a ceasefire. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> nuclear experts in japan are still battling to prevent a meltdown at the fukushima power plant. concerns are growing about a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the reactor complex. workers are using all means possible to cool the reactors that were damaged in the earthquake. the plant had to be evacuated temporarily at one point due to high levels of radiation. >> dense clouds of stream rose from the fukushima nuclear plant on wednesday. but the fire in reactor four was of less concern to the authorities than a possible fracture to the containment vessel of reactor three. p
catastrophe in japan. i'm wolf blitzer. john vos is joining us over in the cnn center in atlanta. a lot of news to cover. let me give our viewers the highlights of what's going on right now. it's now just after 7:00 a.m. saturday in japan. survivors of the strongest earthquake recorded in that country's history are seeing the enormous destruction in the harsh light of day, and they are still being shaken to the core. two powerful new tremors measuring higher than a magnitude of 6 struck within the last hour alone, after the 8.9 monster quake hit japan friday afternoon unleashing a huge tsunami. japanese media reporting that the death toll could be higher than 1,000. hundreds of people may be missing. some may be trapped alive or buried in homes that were simply washed away. the tsunami sent water rushing sever six miles inland. one area of deep concern right now. japanese authorities are trying to cool down the temperature inside a nuclear power plant rattled by the quake. president obama says the united states is helping to monitor the plant for possible radiation leaks. he also sent h
, this is "world business today." we're following two big stories for you this friday, march 18th. >>> in japan, urgent attempts to avert a nuclear crisis enter a second week at the fukushima daiichi plant. workers douse one of the rea reactors with a water cannon. >>> in libya, gunfire in benghazi. but this time in celebration. rebels are rejoicing. but fears of retaliation by moammar gadhafi's forces are pushing the price of oil higher of. >>> so let's go straight to one of our top stories. the u.n. security council has put moammar gadhafi on notice that it will no longer permit his military bombardment of rebel positions from the air. while the council approved a no-fly zone on thursday authorizing "all necessary measures to protect civilians," libyan's ambassador to the united nations warmly welcomed thursday's revolution. he sides with the opposition and has called on gadhafi to step down. >> i would like to start by thanking the members of the security council for the resolution today. it is a clear message -- it is a clear message to the libyan people that they are not alone, that the in
assist in japan after the huge earthquake and tsunami. >>> also, conflicting reports on a possible nuclear meltdown there. what's actually happening? >>> all of this causing a sizeable economic impact in japan, the u.s. and beyond. you're in the cnn news room. i'm fredricka witfield. we'll get to all of those angles in japan and beyond. but first, a look at some other top stories. in the middle east, yemeni security forces fired guns and tear gas at protesters outside sanaa university today. at least 110 people were hurt. protesters are angry over high unemployment and what they see as government corruption and a lack of political freedom. >>> two men with ties to egypt's former leader have been arrested for orchestrating this assault on protesters in cairo's tahrir square. armed attackers charged through the crowd on horses and camels last month. nine days later, hosni mubarak was overthrown. >>> and in the u.s., new york police and the ntsb are investigating a bus crash that killed 14 people. there are conflicting reports about what caused the bus to flip and swerve into a pole y
recommended bed in america. >>> new nuclear fears in japan. officials say a partial meltdown is likely happening now and multiple meltdowns are a real possibility. >>> unbelievable amateur video at the moment the tsunami hit. water pouring in, flooding cars and everything in its way in miyako, japan. more amazing pictures next. hi, everybody. great to have you with me today. i'm thomas roberts. this is the continuing coverage of the disaster in japan. it's 12 noon in the east and 2:00 a.m. monday in japan. three major stories developing now in that country. up first, sobering words from japan's prime minister. he says the earthquake and tsunami disaster is the nation's worst crisis since world war ii. meanwhile, workers at a nuclear power plant hit by the earthquake and tsunami are trying to keep temps down to prevent the disaster from grewing worse. the escalating crisis includes the threat of multiple meltdowns. >>> more than 200,000 people have been forced to evacuate a 12-mile radius around nuclear plants. japan's chief cabinet secretary says nine people tested positive for high ra
territories. >> president obama echoes the message of calm for the american people and support for japan. but did he wait too long? >> president obama's under fire for sticking to his schedule. is he showing admirable discipline, or is it looking like a failure of leadership? >> especially with the espn picks. >> contribute to help the people who have been devastated in japan. >> i was impressed with his picks and his knowledge of players, but that wasn't what the american people needed to see yesterday. >> yesterday president obama called japan's prime minister to discuss the crisis. >> we've got a president who on top of this knows he's got to turn this economy around. >> in some ways the president just can't -- you can't win sometimes. >> the japanese government's credibility continues to sink by the day. >> two very different pieces of advice between the u.s. government and the japanese government -- >> american leaders may be saying what japanese citizens are not hearing. >> there's a tradition in japan of sort of toning down bad news. >> who's in charge of this response effort? is
." >> this is bbc world news today. fears that thousands may have died in japan's earthquake and tsunami and concern is growing about radiation leaks from the clear power stations. authorities in japan are on alert about a possible nuclear meltdown after a second explosion in 48 hours at the fukushima plant. the rescue and relief operations struggle to help half million left homeless. whole communities are wiped off the map. >> every patch are around here, another home to another family. all obliterated. what is left? just a book, bits of a doll, a lamp, and a coffee maker. that is a lamp. >> the disaster also brings economic uncertainty as factories stopped and the stock market slumps. we assessed the impact on the world's third largest economy. arab gulf states send troops into bahrain to help quash anti- government protest. rebels say it is a declaration of war. gaddafi's forces bombing key places and libya as they try to win back the countries east. hello, and welcome. it is being described as the worst disaster in japan since the second world war. the massive earthquake and tsunami that struck
't forget there are enormous numbers of earthquakes in japan. people are not completely terrified every time there is an earthquake. it happens a lot. it's just that this earthquake was one of the most powerful ones ever recorded. one of the interesting things when you get back to the nuclear power plants, thomas, is the nuclear power plants were designed to with stand earthquakes that were five times less powerful than the one that hit them. they weren't designed to sustain a tsunami at the same time. you have to ask was the planning correct here? that's easier in hindsight, but was it correct in terms of safety measures. >> bob, thank you very much. appreciate it. >>> the situation with japan's nuclear reactor brings to mind for a lot of people the 1986 chernobyl disaster in russia and 1979's three mile island disaster in pennsylvania. joining me on the phone is dick thornburg who was governor of pennsylvania during the three mile island crisis. what has been going through your head as you watch the events unfolding in japan and the talk and fear about the nuclear reactors there? >> there
comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
in this story. >>> that frantic battle to contain a nuclear situation growing more serious by the moment. japan is asking the u.s. for help and a very, very small particle of radiation has reached the united states. japan just raised the level of this nuclear incident from a 4 to a 5, although other experts had already pegged it at a 6 on the scale of 7. nuclear experts have been saying for days, japan is underplaying this crisis. here are the official numbers. 6,539 people are dead. of course that number has been climbing steadily. right now, another 10,354 people still missing. as japan struggles to deal with the aftermath of this disaster, 410,000 people are living in shelters or with friends because they have no homes to go to or had to leave the contamination zone. take a look at this new video. it is the closest look we had at japan's troubled fukushima nuclear complex. it's the reason why many people are leaving. a diplomat just told the associated press that a miniscule levels of radiation have reached california's coast. although he says it's, quote, about a billion times beneath level
out of japan. >>> it is 2:00 a.m. tuesday in japan where fears of a nuclear meltdown are only part of the national nightmare, and maybe not even the biggest part. twice now since friday's catastrophe earthquake and tsunami, explosions have rocked the nuclear plant 40 miles south of sendai. you can see the smoke in the distance. the latest happened just hours ago, injuring workers, knocking out the cooling system for another reactor that had been mostly unscathed. workers are scrambling and right now failing to keep the reactor cool from sea water. we'll get much more in a live report in just a moment. >>> elsewhere the focus is people, finding them, saving them, feeding them, reuniting them. it's being done with boats, helicopters and even bicycles. this man has been riding from one shelter to another in search of his wife. 2,000 japanese are unaccounted for. still survivors who have nothing else are refusing to let go of hope. >> translator: i'm looking for my daughter. our home is gone so she wouldn't know where to go. as other family members are safe, i only hope my daughter is
in japan's history an emperor gone on television to address a national crisis. the emperor akihito told the japanese people not to lose hope three reactors damaged at the plants. this is a view up above. that is reactor three on the left-hand side of your screen and reactor four in the middle. if you can determine that. radiation levels surged after that white cloud of smoke was seen coming from reactor three. the fear there is a crack in the steel and concrete shell that insulates radioactive material as cnn stan grant tells us, even nuclear experts are stumped by this white cloud. >> they are looking into exactly what has caused that and they are still working on whether this consumption vessel that surrounds the core of the nuclear reactor holding in the more nasty radioactive substances has, in fact, than breached. this is an ongoing concern. they have assumptions about what is happening but they can't get in and have a look at it. remember, as well, the work is from the plant today workers from the plant today were forced to evacuate themselves and after a fire in the reactor numbe
where you left off. more than ever, when we talk about the nightmare in japan, we're really talking about two nightmares. the nuclear one and everything else. again today, fire broke out at that devastated fukushima daiichi plant. and another blast of radiation escaped, for reasons still not entirely clear. the few remaining workers had to leave but they came right back in even greater numbers when the danger eased. this crisis stems from overheated fuel rods but elsewhere in japan, a cold snap, including snow, adding to the misery. searching, supporting, surviving, all of it is made more grueling because of the weather. officially the death toll topped 4,000, with more than 8,000 considered missing. this woman is scouring the rubble for her uncle. she thought she may have found his shoe. the nation heard from the emperor, reserveder pot direst of national emergencies. the emperor act key per act hes heart is broken. the volunteer utility workers who have been exposed to life-threatening radiation levels ots fukushima daiichi. their company hasn't released personal information abou
>>> on the broadcast tonight, the disaster in japan. in the aftermath of the quake and the tsunami, now there's a full scale nuclear scare, and it's deepening. tonight the u.s. is being asked for more help. our team is on the ground and our coverage begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening, it started with a freak of nature, the fifth largest earthquake ever recorded on the planet, but then, right then as the rubble settled and the buildings stopped swaying, the water came ashore. the tsunami in japan killed thousands. in some parts of some towns, there's no remaining evidence that anyone ever lived there. and now tonight the crisis has taken yet another turn, and we are covering a full-blown nuclear scare in japan. there are 17 nuclear power plants across that country, 54 nuclear reactors in all, but one plant in particular is in trouble. it's the fukushima plant, and if you've seen the pictures of it over the weekend, you may know. there was one explosion in one building on saturday, another just yesterday. and now a third reactor is in trouble a
." >> japan appeals for international help. evacuation. some are treated for radiation exposure and the authorities ordered everyone out of the surrounding area. the grim search goes on. tens of thousands missing, and fears of another tsunami. >> everyone was just running there. trying to get as far away as possible. >> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- coming up, the u.n. security council discusses a no-fly zone over libya, but nothing is agreed. and conversation in bahrain. protesters set up roadblocks as 1000 at saudi troops entered the country. hello. millions in the parts of northeast japan hammered by last week's quake and tsunami have spent their fourth night without food, water, electricity, or gas. at least 500,000 people have been left homeless, but even now, much is still unknown. communications are still down in many areas. about 2000 bodies have been found washed ashore. half of them in a town that was flattened by the water. as japan struggles to deal wi
cannot wait for mummy to come home. bbc news, northeastern japan. >> it is astonishing, the resilience and restraint that the people have been exhibiting. >> you mentioned yukio edano and his latest news conference, and he said their credentials have not been affected. how can that be when some manufacturers have all said that their manufacturing will be affected? >> that is a good question. i do not know the ins and outs. what everyone is saying is that the supply lines will have been affected by this, and a lot of the microchips that are going to your ipad or my iphone, they come through here. this will have a knock-on effect. but it also depends on who was in the earthquake zone. i am not sure how many microchip plants have been affected. the last time i checked, the nikkei was down. this country is twice as indebted as the united states, and beyond the reconstruction efforts, putting money back into the economy, at the end of today, japan has been struggling ever since it's a bubble burst in 1990 and will continue to do so -- ever since its bubble burst. >> this is bbc news. still
develop -pblts and brand-new stories this hour. the scale of japan's disaster one of the worst in history. another strong earthquake shakes tokyo. a tsunami clams one coastal city, the damage $40 million. forces loyal to moammar gadhafi reportedly making big gains. word they captured an opposition stronghold west of the capitol. what is next, a question we are going to ask. it's all new and live and it's "happening now." greg: a lot of news to get to on this tuesday. good morning to you i'm jon scott. jenna: good morning, i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom. happening right now a new aftershock rocking gentleman man as the nation koeps with a nuclear disaster in the making after a third exemploys at one of your plants causing radiation to league out at dangerous levels. the water meant to cool off the fuel rods now reportedly boiling, a very tphopl must sign, jon, some way. greg: that's right. at least two dozen people nearby getting the contamination treatment while another 140,000 people in the danger season have been ordered to seal themselves indoors. jenna: just imagine wh
. many people who live and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan, and now they want to go home. there is definitely more than just a trickle now of families leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. most of the more than 30 million people who live in and around the city, though, leaving is not an option. they have no place to go and if there is a major release of radiation from the fukushima plant, there dawes -- doesn't seem to be a plan what to do either. if there is, the asumi family hasn't been told about it. they are watching the events to the north with growing consternation. they have an 8-month-old baby and they simple isly don't trust what the government is telling them about the lack of danger. >> i don't think so. you don't trust them in? i don't trust them. >> why not? >> because companies say not -- not truth. >> and what is this you have bought? is is this new if >> yeah, new. >> so instead the asumis like millions of other tokyoites are making their own plans. helmets, facemasks and a car standing by to head south at a moment's noti
." >> japan's prime minister appeals for calm after a third explosion at the fukushima daichi. naoto kan said everyone within 20 kilometers should leave immediately. >> we need now for everybody to move out of the 20 kilometer radius from the number one plant. >> in cities and towns reduced to rubble by the tsunami which followed the earthquake, the death toll could be as many as 10,000. a country still literally shaken by the aftershocks is coming to grips with the recovery effort. it will take years and an immeasurable income impact. become to "bbc world news." broadcasting in the u.k. and around the world. in this program, confrontation in bahrain. protestors set up road blocks in the capital as 1,000 saudi troops enter the country, and the u.n. security council discusses a no-fly zone over libya but nothing is agreed. member states are too divided. there's been a third big explosion at the fukushima power plant in japan which was badly damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami. a four-fold increase in radiation levels has been released into the air surrounding the plant. the prime minist
:00 a.m. in japan, and hundreds of people are still missing. that massive quake hit the area just about 12:45 a.m. eastern time. sparking hundreds of aftershocks and a devastating tsunami a short time later. police in japan now say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in sendai, the city closest to the epicenter. these are the first moments of terror. buildings began to crumble, sending huge blocks of concrete tumbling to the streets. the most powerful earthquake in 140 years volted life to a frightening halt. epicenter, 81 miles off of japan's northeast coast, near sendai, home to around 1 million people. south of sendasendai, the ceili the airport crashed to the floor. tre tre tremors felt 230 miles away in tokyo, turning a meeting with japan's prime minister in the parliament building into chaos. the quake ignited fires that is made up of a chain of islands. a spectacular fire erupted in the chiba refinery east of tokyo. dependent on nuclear power, utility companies shut down reactors. thousands of residence were ordered to evacuate homes near a plant southwest of sendai, after its cool
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
>>> on the broadcast tonight, the desperate measures under way to get the nuclear crisis in japan under control. >>> and president obama tells americans there's no threat from radiation coming across the pacific. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewers joining us in the west. while the japanese deal with a staggering humanitarian crisis, they are now engaging in a last-resort effort to stop perhaps multiple meltdowns at nuclear reactors. and today president obama had to reassure the american public especially those along the west coast, that these fears of some sort of radioactive cloud coming across the pacific just aren't true. here now the latest on the disaster in japan. desperate measures now under way to lessen the nuclear disaster. while tonight japanese officials are saying they have rare good news of some levels stabilizing, late today we got the first look at the reactors close up. this new video of a helicopter fly-over showing the destruction. then there are the numbers. just under 5700 dead, ju
. "morning joe" starts right now. >> this is an international tragedy and although japan is a highly advanced economy and technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, it's important all of us join together in providing any help and assistance that we can in the days and months to come. >>> good morning. it is tuesday, march 15th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in washington, msnbc political analyst, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public
up right after this. see you. tuesday. disaster in japan. another explosion in fukushima. radiation from the blast reportedly blowing offshore. then a nuclear watchdog group upgrading the severity of the situation a 6 on a 7-point scale. chernobyl was a 7. 3 mile island was a 5. we are somewhere in between both of those in a moment. alisyn: the situation seem to be getting more dangerous. all four reacto rereacross -- as seem to be affected. listen to the prime minister. >> the radiation level is high and there is a high chance of further radiation from here on. anyone within a 20-mile range of fukushima needs to evacuate. i understand most people did. and we urge people within a 20-30 mile range to stay indoo indoors. bill: this is the plant in question. there are four different reactors that are of concern. here is number one, here is number two, number 3 and number 4. all of these reactors on the picture you see now. this is how they were intact before the earthquake happened and the tsunami wiped them out. here is where we are now. saturday you reactor number one you had an expl
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
that there hasn't been a broader call for help from japan may have something to do with it. relief efforts right now are focused on immediate needs like food, water and medical care. all goods and services that can be purchased locally. internationally charities like the red cross, world vision and save the children are on the ground doi ining exactly that already. that's why cash donations now directed at those charities may be the best thing americans can do to help the victims when their need is the most. for more information, go to cnn.com/impact. >>> that's it for me. brooke baldwin takes over now with "newsroom". >>> my promise to you, we won't get too far from japan chblt we'll get to the new images and information there in just a moment. >>> first, i want you to listen to what secretary of state hillary clinton has now just told cnn's wolf blitzer. >> we don't want any ambiguity. only the security council can authorize action, and if they do authorize action, there needs to be a true international response, including arab leadership and partnership. >> wolf is traveling right along with
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
team in tripoli. but we begin with the terrible devastation in northeastern japan. the destruction there simply epic. the death toll mounting. exact numbers unknown. now a nuclear emergency. several badly damaged power station reactors with serious cooling problems. pressure building. reports now of radiation venting at two of them. we'll talk to a woman whose husband was in one of the plants, he escaped. all of it and everything else. the result of the fifth largest quake in recorded history. just look at that wave. followed by the wave, a fast-moving tsunami wave that turned everything into its past, even miles inland, into rubble. watch as it hits those buildings head on. this is what it looked like as it made landfall. you can see it's not just seawater we're talking about. there is deadly debris, cars, trucks, small houses being swept along, smashing and battering everything in their path. the tsunami reaching all the way to the american west coast where several people were swept out to sea. magnitude 8.9. look at those cars being swept away. according to the u.s. geological s
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
kneejerk reactions that didn't seem to take into account the new nuances of the crisis japan is experiencing. the fact is that the idea of more nuclear energy was just starting to gain ground in the united states, given the interest in clean, abundant and cheap energy. that nuclear renaissance in america is now in danger. right now one-fifth of america's electricity comes from 104 nuclear reactors. they're expensive. companies were loathed to build them, given the tangle of regulations so the federal government offered loan guarantees to get operators to invest their money. president obama is asking for $36 billion for nuclear power in this year's proposed budget. 12 applications right now for construction and licenses. but real safety issues during unforeseen catastrophic events like what happened in japan will have to be addressed by the industry. we still need alternatives to oil and coal, but we'll have to see whether more nuclear generated electricity is part of our future. that's it for me now. brooke baldwin takes over with "newsroom". >>> we are going to take you to l
: box number one, japan's government raising the threat level of the damaged nuclear plant. box two, we hear that the japanese officials considering the so-called chernobyl opening to bring the plant under control. live coverage and what that may mean ahead. box three: president obama getting ready for a five-day trip to south america in the middle of all that is happening in japan and the middle east and right here at home. we will discuss the timing with chris wallace. that is ahead unless breaking news changes everything. in "studio b" today. and from japan the government has officially raised the threat level of the badly damaged fukushima nuclear power plant from a level 4 to a level 5 and that is on an international scale of 7 and it puts it on par with the disaster at three mile island. the worst nuclear accident in american history. for context, a level 5 nuclear emergency entails severe damage to a reactor core; the release of massive amount of radiation and high problem deficit of significant public exposure," and several deaths from radiation, and from the director of the pow
japan'is's eye view of damaged nuclear plant. the effort to cool it goes on. people living near this facility flee for safety. japan fears as many as 15,000 may have died. welcome to "bbc world news." forces come to's benghazi. he delivers a radio message. >> we are coming on this happy day. tomorrow, benghazi will change and there will again be a fun, dance, and cries of joy. >> has japanese nuclear engineers battle to prevent a disaster, there is no let up. half a million people made homeless by friday's earthquake and tsunami. more supplies are reaching survivors. many still lack basic necessities. dozens of the evacuation centers have been set up. thousands were forced to flee from the nuclear exclusion zone. >> they come seeking refuge. fleeing tradition of's nuclear plant -- fukushima's nuclear plant and carrying what is most precious to them. there is a chance for radiation. more than 1000 have arrived here already. there are reunions. exhaustion and relief. this family was just 5 miles from the damaged reactor. as they made it here, the fuel in their car was running out.
, we'll bring that to you live. in japan today here, the focus really is on this number 3 reactor. that is where we saw the video. you see it here of these helicopters dropping water. sea water in this attempt to cool it off and prevent a possible meltdown. tokyo electric or tepco is in this desperate rush to build a power line so the fukushima daiichi plant can power up its cooling systems once again. later on in this newscast, i'll be speaking with a man, an american man who was inside one of the facility, actually in a building next to one of the reactors working when the quake hit last friday. >> cracks were opening up on the ground. i looked over at the buildings around me and glass was breaking, lights, sirens, people screaming. >> can you imagine? he's a software engineer there for a couple weeks working on the power plant's computers. he has not spoken to cn nyet. but he will on this tram. we will also check in with our team in tokyo where shrinking supplies of food and gases are a growing concern. >>> a lot of ground to cover here. right off the bat, i want to show you so
of what's happened in japan. >> he is a supporter of the nuclear industry, but with a big push lately to rest restart our stalled reaction of the nuclear power plant capability. this is causing real concern and soul searching>> there are 442 nuclear reactors operating in the world right now. 55 are in japan. 6 of those have had problems since the earthquake and ju tsui the past week. this is what the boiling water reactor looks like now. you can see the explosion happened in the secondary containment area but at this point in time the primary containment area remains in tact. for historical context the international atomic energy uses a 7 level scale for the nuclear event level one is an anomaly but a second is an accident. chernobyl was a 7 right now japan is a 4. that's what a nuclear expert said this morning and he added it could soon become a five. >> the worse case scenario is that the fuel rods fuse together the temperatures get so hot they melt together into a radioactive molten mass of mechanisms and is exposed to the outside. there are few radioactive it in to the ground into
. >> a fox urgent, nuclear crisis in japan. i'm harris falkner, we're live with a special edition of fox report. a new threat of multiple reactor meltdowns and frantically trying to cool down the reactors with sea water and are' looking at the two plants in question, fukushima where there's been at least one explosion and the other, where we're getting word now radiation levels have dropped back to normal after what they're doing there for the problem. japan's prime minister speaking about friday's twin disasters, the earthquake and tsunami and now the nuclear threat. his words through a translator. >> 65 years after the end of world war ii, this is the toughers and most difficult for japan in that period. >> harris: we're just starting to get some satellite images. this is sendai, the epicenter of the quake. before on the left side of the screen and after. you can see how a torrent of tsunami driven mud ripped through the covered ground here. the government confirming now more than 2500 buildings in that city destroyed. scientists have just revised their estimates now how big that earth
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
missing japanese are returning to japan. >>> among the 28 japanese who remain unaccounted for in christchurch are a number of nurses. they were studying english there. why are japanese nurses going a abroad to study and work? nhk world found out. >> reporter: nhk world found out. >> reporter: noriko is one of the missing japanese who left for christchurch in january. after working as a nurse in japan for about seven years, she went overseas in the hope of acquiring english skills and becoming involved with international nursing activities. she had taken part in the activities of a nonprofit organization in cambodia. a doctor, who also was a teammate, praises her. >> translator: she's cheerful and positive about everything. i think she is an excellent nurse. >> reporter: her school offered english for nurses who wanted to work overseas. many japanese nurses were in the school in christchurch when it collapsed. this woman has been a nurse for six years. just like others, she wants to work in developing countries or a disaster site in the future. >> translator: i want to help
rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national security correspondent david martin at the pentagon. >> an unmanned reconnaissance zone takes off from sicily to survey the damage done by american missiles and bombs. an overhead photo shows what happened to the battlefield. >> you can see the shelters, one of which we have blown up here that is actuall
on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and toda
, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in these attacks he launched from south america to stop gadhafi from firing on his own people. we
york. the president is expected to make a statement about japan at 3:30 eastern time as japan grapples with a nuclear crisis and the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami there. the latest, the death toll stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 people still missing. at the pufukushima nuclear plan desperate attempts to cool the reactor but these efforts are having limited impact. and the danger of radiation has delayed efforts to permanently restore water to the pumps to cool the reactor. power may not be up and rung until tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen.
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
the u.s. will now lead military action to stop gadhafi's brutal crackdown. and in japan, the nuclear crisis goes up a notch, increased to a higher alert level. what will it take to cool down those reactors and prevent a nuclear meltdown. our teams are on the ground across the world and "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewer in the west tonight. tonight we have to take you on something of a tour of the world to cover the overwhelming amount of news going on. and while we have been focused on the disaster in japan, where the nuclear alert level actually went up a notch today, while it's been going on for exactly a week tonight, instead we must begin tonight back in libya. today president obama announced that on top of the twor wars we're fighting, the u.s. will now take the lead on possible military action in libya. the u.n. approved it last night. it started out as a no-fly zone but has grown into something perhaps bigger. a nato ultimatum of gadhafi of libya that the president says is non-negotiable. gadhafi d
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